The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy

 
Publisher: OUP USA
Date of Publication:
 
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Product details:

ISBN13:9780199328383
ISBN10:0199328382
Binding:Hardback
No. of pages:664 pages
Size:256x180x49 mm
Weight:1142 g
Language:English
727
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Short description:

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy provides a thorough exploration of Roman philosophy as a valuable study in its own right. Topics covered include ethnicity, cultural identity, literary originality, the environment, Roman philosophical figures, epistemology, and ethics.

Long description:
Several decades of scholarship have demonstrated that Roman thinkers developed in new and stimulating directions the systems of thought they inherited from the Greeks, and that, taken together, they offer many perspectives that are of philosophical interest in their own right. The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy explores a range of such Roman philosophical perspectives through thirty-four newly commissioned essays. Where Roman philosophy has long been considered a mere extension of Hellenistic systems of thought, this volume moves beyond the search for sources and parallels and situates Roman philosophy in its distinctive cultural context.

The Oxford Handbook of Roman Philosophy emphasizes four features of Roman philosophy: aspects of translation, social context, philosophical import, and literary style. The authors adopt an inclusive approach, treating not just systematic thinkers such as Cicero and Augustine, but also poets and historians. Topics covered include ethnicity, cultural identity, literary originality, the environment, Roman philosophical figures, epistemology, and ethics.

This volume represents a magnificent treatment of a major period of European intellectual history... [It] provides a comprehensive overview of Roman philosophy, but it does much more than that. It invites a reflection on the broader nature of what Roman philosophy actually is and considers a manifold range of sources, including some more often considered literary, rather than philosophical. The volume makes a cogent argument for Roman philosophy as a distinctive phenomenon and a worthy object of study in its own right, rather than merely a poor derivative of a superior Greek original.
Table of Contents:
Preface
Myrto Garani, David Konstan, and Gretchen Reydams-Schils
List of Contributors
PART I. THE ROMAN PHILOSOPHER: AFFILIATION, IDENTITY, SELF, AND OTHER
Italic Pythagoreanism in the Hellenistic Age
Phillip Sidney Horky
Epicurean Orthodoxy and Innovation: From Lucretius to
Diogenes of Oenoanda
Pamela Gordon
Ethical Argument and Epicurean Subtext in Horace, Odes 1.1 and 2.16
Gregson Davis
Seneca and Stoic Moral Psychology
Gretchen Reydams-Schils
Marcus Aurelius and the Tradition of Spiritual Exercises
John Sellars
Apuleius and Roman Demonology
Jeffrey Ulrich
Philosophers and Roman Friendship
David Konstan
Debate or Guidance? Cicero on Philosophy
Malcolm Schofield
PART II. WRITING AND ARGUING ROMAN PHILOSOPHY
The Epicureanism of Lucretius
Tim O'Keefe
Cicero and the Evolution of Philosophical Dialogue
Matthew Fox
The Stoic Lesson: Cornutus and Epictetus
Michael Erler
Persius's Paradoxes
Aaron Kachuck
Plutarch
George Karamanolis
Parrh?sia: Dio, Diatribe, and Philosophical Oratory
Dana Fields
Consolation
James Ker
The Shape of the Tradition to Come: Academic Arguments in Cicero
Orazio Cappello
Persius on Stoic Poetics
Claudia Wiener
PART III. INSIDE AND OUTSIDE OF ROMAN PHILOSOPHY
Translation
Christina Hoenig
Roman Philosophy in Its Political and Historiographical Context
Ermanno Malaspina and Elisa Della Calce
Rhetoric
Erik Gunderson
Self and World in extremis in Roman Stoicism
James I. Porter
Medicine
David Leith
Sex
Kurt Lampe
Time
Duncan F. Kennedy
Death
James Warren
Environment
Daniel Bertoni
PART I V. AFTER ROMAN PHILOSOPHY: TRANSMISSION AND IMPACT
Roman Presocratics: Bio-Doxography in the Late Republic
Myrto Garani
Reading Aristotle at Rome
Myrto Hatzimichali
Christian Ethics: The Reception of Cicero in Ambrose's De officiis
Ivor J. Davidson
Augustine's Reception of Platonism
Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic
Roman Quasity: A Matrix of Byzantine Thought and History
Anthony Kaldellis
Latin Neoplatonism: The Medieval Period
Agnieszka Kijewska
Transmitting Roman Philosophy: The Renaissance
Quinn Griffin
"The Art of Self-Deception": Libertine Materialism and Roman Philosophy
Natania Meeker
Index