The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?
 
Product details:

ISBN13:9780141991177
ISBN10:0141991178
Binding:Paperback
No. of pages:288 pages
Size:197x130x15 mm
Weight:213 g
Language:English
701
Category:

The Tyranny of Merit

What's Become of the Common Good?
 
Publisher: Penguin
Date of Publication:
Number of Volumes: B-format paperback
 
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Long description:

A TLS, GUARDIAN AND NEW STATESMAN BOOK OF THE YEAR 2020

The new bestseller from the acclaimed author of Justice and one of the world's most popular philosophers

"Astute, insightful, and empathetic...A crucial book for this moment" Tara Westover, author of Educated

These are dangerous times for democracy. We live in an age of winners and losers, where the odds are stacked in favour of the already fortunate. Stalled social mobility and entrenched inequality give the lie to the promise that "you can make it if you try". And the consequence is a brew of anger and frustration that has fuelled populist protest, with the triumph of Brexit and election of Donald Trump.

Michael J. Sandel argues that to overcome the polarized politics of our time, we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalisation and rising inequality. Sandel highlights the hubris a meritocracy generates among the winners and the harsh judgement it imposes on those left behind. He offers an alternative way of thinking about success - more attentive to the role of luck in human affairs, more conducive to an ethic of humility, and more hospitable to a politics of the common good.