The Socio-Economics of Roman Storage: Agriculture, Trade, and Family

The Socio-Economics of Roman Storage

Agriculture, Trade, and Family
 
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Date of Publication:
 
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Product details:

ISBN13:9781108495530
ISBN10:1108495532
Binding:Hardback
No. of pages:296 pages
Size:260x185x19 mm
Weight:810 g
Language:English
Illustrations: 38 b/w illus. 12 colour illus. 3 maps 8 tables
736
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Short description:

In a pre-industrial world, storage could make or break farmers and empires alike. How did it shape the Roman empire?

Long description:
In a pre-industrial world, storage could make or break farmers and empires alike. How did it shape the Roman empire?&&&160;The Socio-Economics of Roman Storage&&&160;cuts across the scales of farmer and state to trace the practical and moral reverberations of storage from villas in Italy to silos in Gaul, and from houses in Pompeii to warehouses in Ostia. Following on from the material turn, an abstract notion of 'surplus' makes way for an emphasis on storage's material transformations (e.g. wine fermenting; grain degrading; assemblages forming), which actively shuffle social relations and economic possibilities, and are a sensitive indicator of changing mentalities. This archaeological study tackles key topics, including the moral resonance of agricultural storage; storage as both a shared and a contested concern during and after conquest; the geography of knowledge in domestic settings; the supply of the metropolis of Rome; and the question of how empires scale up. It will be of interest to scholars and students of Roman archaeology and history, as well as anthropologists who study the links between the scales of farmer and state.