Enthusiasm: The Kantian Critique of History
 
Product details:

ISBN13:9780804738972
ISBN10:0804738971
Binding:Hardback
No. of pages:104 pages
Size:216x140 mm
Weight:666 g
Language:English
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Enthusiasm

The Kantian Critique of History
 
Edition number: 1
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Date of Publication:
Number of Volumes: Print PDF
 
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Short description:

Enthusiasm is Lyotard's most elaborate and provocative statement on the politics of the sublime.

Long description:

Enthusiasm studies what Kant calls a "strong" sense of the sublime, not as an aesthetic feeling but as a form of political judgment rendered not by the active participants in historical events but those who witness them from afar. Lyotard's analysis, preparatory to his work in The Differend and subsequent publications, is a radical rereading of the Kantian "faculties," traditionally understood as functions of the mind, in terms of a philosophy of phrases derived from Lyotard's prior encounters with Wittgenstein's theory of language games. The result is a kind of "fourth" critique based in Kant's later political and historical writings, with an emphasis on understanding the place of those sudden and unscripted events that have the power to reshape the political/historical landscape (such as the French Revolution, May 1968, and others).



"Exploring the notions of 'passages', the sublime, freedom, the nature of the political and the sign of history, Enthusiasm may be fascinating to undergraduates newly-introduced to Lyotard's work and intriguing to those seeking to contextualize what they have already grasped."?Benjamin Hutchens, James Madison University, Philosophy in Review