The Routledge Companion to African American Art History

 
Edition number: 1
Publisher: Routledge
Date of Publication:
 
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Product details:

ISBN13:9780367553647
ISBN10:0367553643
Binding:Paperback
No. of pages:522 pages
Size:246x174 mm
Weight:961 g
Language:English
Illustrations: 71 Illustrations, black & white
692
Category:
Short description:

This Companion authoritatively points to the main areas of enquiry within the subject of African American art history. This book will be of interest to graduate students, researchers and professors and may be used in African American art, visual culture, and culture classes.

Long description:

This Companion authoritatively points to the main areas of enquiry within the subject of African American art history.


 The first section examines how African American art has been constructed over the course of a century of published scholarship. The second section studies how African American art is and has been taught and researched in academia. The third part focuses on how African American art has been reflected in art galleries and museums. The final section opens up understandings of what we mean when we speak of African American art.


This book will be of interest to graduate students, researchers, and professors and may be used in American art, African American art, visual culture, and culture classes.

Table of Contents:

Part One: Historical Framings; 1 Patricia Hills: ?History Must Restore What Slavery Took Away?: Freeman H. M. Murray, Double
-Consciousness, and the Historiography of African American Art History; 2 Mary Ann Calo: The Significance of the Interwar Decades to Scholarship on African American Art; 3 Phoebe Wolfskill: The Enduring Relevance of the Harlem Renaissance; 4 John Ott: African American Art Beyond the Harlem Renaissance; 5 Melanie Anne Herzog: African American Artists and Mexico; 6 Anna Arabindan
-Kesson: Caribbean Absences in African American Art; 7 Tobias Wofford: The Influence of African Art on African American Art; 8 Kirsten Pai Buick: Confessions of an Unintended Reader: African American Art, American Art, and the Crucible of Naming; 9 Tanya Sheehan: On Display: The Art of African American Photography; 10 Margo Natalie Crawford: When Black Experimentalism Became Black Power: The Black Arts Movement and its Legacies; Part Two: Within the Academy; 11 John Tyson: The Washington Renaissance: Black Artists and Modern Institutions; 12 Tatiana Flores: Disturbing Categories, Remapping Knowledge; 13 Andrea Barnwell Brownlee: The Atlanta University Center: A Nucleus of Visual Art; 14 Sarah Lewis: African American Abstraction; 15 Mary M Thomas: Within/Against: Circuits and Networks of African American Art in California; 16 Kymberly Pinder: Black Grace: The Religious Impulse in African American Art; 17 Theresa Leininger
-Miller: New Negro Artists in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s; 18 Nizan Shaked: Getting to a Baseline on Identity Politics: the Marxist Debate; 19 Rebecca Zorach: African American Artists and the Community Mural Movement; 20 Betty Crouther: The South in African American Art; Part Three: Curatorial Histories and Strategies; 21 Lesley Shipley: New York in/and African American Art History; 22 Blake Bradford: Ain?t No Stoppin? Us Now
- African American Artists in Philadelphia since 1940; 23 Katherine Jentleson: Surveying the Presence of Self
-Taught African American Artists in American Museums; 24 Richard Hylton: Status and Presence: African American Art in the International Arena; 25 Modupe Labode: Black Public Art in the United States; 26 Nicholas Miller: The History of the Group Exhibition from the Harmon Foundation to Black Male; 27 Elaine Yau: Black / Folk / Art: Shapeshifting Roles of "the Folk" in African American Art; 28 Julie McGee: The Artist & the Archive: African American Art; 29 Nika Elder: African American Art and the White Cube; 30 Celeste
-Marie Bernier: "Feeling for my People": Visualizing Resistance, Radicalism, and Revolution; Part Four: Historical, Modern and Contemporary Considerations; 31 Uri McMillan: Unruly Polyvocality: Networks of Black Performance Art; 32 Leslie Wilson: Can You Get to That?: The funk of ?conceptual
-type art?; 33 Rehema C. Barber: Picturing Freedom: The Legacy of Representing Black Womanhood; 34Allan Edmunds: The Printed Image: Process and Influences in African American Art; 35 Derek Conrad Murray: Queer Aesthetics in the History of?African American Art; 36 Nigel Freeman: African
-American Artists and the Art Market: A Dream Deferred; 37 Kemi Adeyemi: Black Women Curators: A Brief Oral History of the Recent Past; 38 Rebecca VanDiver: Breaking Ground: Constructions of Identity in African American Art; 39 James Smalls: Post
-blackness and New Developments in African American Art and Art History; 40 Eddie Chambers: African American Art History: Concluding Considerations